Volunteer Opportunities

Here are some upcoming mission opportunities you can help with:

GREATER CHICAGO FOOD DEPOSITORY VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY    
Please come join us to help volunteer at the Greater Chicago Food Depository (GCFD) on Saturday, January 12 from 8:30am to11:15. We will meet at church to carpool at 7:45. We also go every Wednesday from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. (meet to carpool at 5:15). The GCFD, Chicago’s food bank, is a non-profit food distribution and training center providing food for hungry people. The Food Depository distributes donated and purchased food through a network of 650 pantries, soup kitchens and shelters to 678,000 adults and children in Cook County every year. They rely heavily on their volunteers to help repack bulk products, assemble boxes with assorted food, check expiration dates, glean produce, etc. Participants must be at least 14 years old. For more information go to http://www.chicagosfoodbank.org or see/call Cindi Fiandaca or Judy Birmingham to sign up.

Do you enjoy making repairs, painting, gardening, or other building & grounds work? The Building and Grounds Ministry Board would love to hear from you, and help match the work you enjoy doing with our needs at Lyonsville. Reach out to board chair Tom McSweeney to let us know how you’d like to contribute.

LYONSVILLE FOOD PANTRY
Beginning in January 2019 the food pantry will only be open on the last Sunday of the month, which will be January 27. The hours will be 11:45—12:30pm. We would like to have two or three people there to help assists our guests/visitors during this time.

We are looking for people who can serve as Sunday Greeters and/or Coffee Hour Hosts. If you can help, please sign up on the sheets in the Fellowship Hall or contact Sherry Suomi.

 

 

 

December 9, 2018 Sermon

“For Such a Time As This: Courage and Peace”                                                           Esther 4:1-17
Rev. Sean Weston                                                                                                                           
Lyonsville Congregational UCC, Indian Head Park IL
December 9, 2018

Today’s sermon will be from the perspective of Mordecai, one of the characters in this story. Mordecai was the uncle of Esther. He raised her from a young age after her parents died.

Esther is often considered the star of this story, the one who bravely intervened against the King’s plans to wipe out her people. She is an example of courage and faithfulness, and she helped ensure her peoples’ ability to live in peace. However, Esther did not act alone. And it can be hard to relate to her – how many of us are Queens in a royal palace, hiding our minority status? Many more of us, like Mordecai, may only come up to the palace gates. We may feel that we have no influence over what happens in the halls of power. We may feel like peace is a far-off dream and all we can do is wait and hope. As you listen for his story, consider your own calling to courageous action for God’s peace. Continue reading

December 2, 2018 Sermon

“Watching and Waiting”                                                              Habakkuk 1:1-4, 2:1-4, 3:17-20
Rev. Sean Weston                                                                                                                           
Lyonsville Congregational UCC, Indian Head Park IL
December 2, 2018

One year ago minus eight days, I stood in this pulpit for the first time and preached a sermon about waiting. As I prepared for this Sunday, for another sermon on waiting, for the beginning of yet another season of Advent, part of me got restless: “another sermon on waiting?”

It’s really not the sort of thing that’s a lot of fun to preach about. Lots of church people like Advent, but when asked why I’ve rarely heard “because of the preaching.” The music, yes. The candles, yes. The preaching? Eh. But waiting is something that is part of our lives. It’s a hard thing, and it is not going to go away.

So here I am, talking about waiting once more.

People back in the prophet Habakkuk’s time didn’t like waiting either. Their situation was horrible. The Assyrian army had destroyed city after city, brutally killing people.

Habakkuk and his people had a question: “Lord, how long will I call for help and you not listen?” And so Habakkuk did what people do when we need to hear from God: he entered into discernment. He voiced his peoples’ deep pain and fear and trauma, asking the age-old question. Where is God? “I cry out to you, ‘Violence!’ but you don’t deliver us.” Continue reading